A World Where The Prophet Is Sold On A Magazine

Today, more than 3 million people would be looking at Prophet Muhammad, and still be far away from seeing him.

Today, a publication popularised by the violence of few will be flooding the streets. The ink will be liberal as it goes over the glossy paper over and over again.

A turban, scrawny beard, fearsome eyes, funny nose and all the other typical characteristics apparently found in the desert. A man that many Muslims follow as a unique example will be inked to match the popular stereotype.

Today, our eyes will see what the the mind will not comprehend. The lips will utter words that are of a foreign language. Yet, the image would be purported to be of the one that united tribes scattered over the entire Arabian Peninsula.

Today, the world will watch with pride the resilience of heroes. Heroes with a fixation to offend a man they little understand. Heroes that will garner reactions reeking of villainous contempt.

Today, the Mohammads of Arabia, Asia, Europe and Africa will hear their names called out in vain, perhaps also with outright disrespect.

Today, eyes will be glued on the cover of a magazine that few cared about yesterday. Today, the readers will hear gunshots of yesterday while their eyes remain fixed on an ugly depiction.

Today, Muslims will wonder if they owe the world an apology. Alas, if that stopped the ink from flowing, I’d spend the rest of the night saying sorry.

Today, a man people try to emulate in actions is now emulating a mix of notions and perceptions on attire and expressions. A man people imagine through deeds and actions is living a life of nothingness on paper.

Today, the line of freedom will blur. Offence will overpower the offended, a thinker would be overpowered by a cartoonist. The one with empathy will be accused of not doing enough, the one with a few strokes of the brush will have done everything.

Today, a caricature would leave billions in bad taste, what is meant to leave the subject in a state of discomfit.

It won’t be a statesman laundering money, nor a banker dictatingthe government. The cover will depict a man who’s generosity could rival their appetite for offence.

Today will not be the first when the Prophet will be sold on a magazine. It may be the first when an angry crowd finds in it a response to violence. It’s the first, the work of which people will call its own. With hashtags thrown in to claim ownership, the cartoonist will be one and the endorsers many.

Today, homes will shelter a copy with this depiction. Guests will discuss the incident that got leaders to walk on the streets. From the cushions of their elitist offices to the boulevards of Paris. A rare exertion that deserved a great satire.

Today, more than 3 million will see a face  yet not see it.

Today, I fear for everyone who sees the ugly depiction of our Prophet. What would happen when there comes a day to see him and you search for a stereotypical caricature.

Imagine a day when you’re too embarrassed to admit the Prophet is in front of you.

Imagine a day when you’re too embarrassed to agree that he doesn’t look like the cover photo that did not offend you.

Imagine a day when you’re reluctant to see the Prophet, because this time it cannot be bought with a few cents and the emotions of a billion Muslims.

صلى الله عليه وآله وصحبه وسلم

(May God exalt and bring peace upon the Prophet, his family, and his companions)

Prophet(Blog)

Review 2014 : When Islam entered some awkward spaces

In the year that we’ve just bade farewell, Islam and Muslims around the world were tested with some disturbing trends. The lion’s share of this obstruction to a routine, peaceful life was contributed by the ISIL – the Islamic State of Iraq and Levant – a separatist group that continues to exercise crime and persecution as you read.

While this transnational occurrence got the debate flowing around its legitimate claims to Islam (read ‘political Islam’), some local and episodic incidences also dictated conversations throughout the year 2014.

Here are 4 incidences in 2014 that I believe took Islam in some awkward spheres of discussion, and my brief take on each of them

4 – In the name of “Allah”…if only a Muslim

In the month of June, 2014, Malaysia’s Muslim-majority country garnered attention and criticism for a contentious decision by the High Court. The ruling refused to overturn a ban on the use of the word ‘Allah’ by Christian communities for reference to ‘God’. Put in place in year 2007, the ban was instituted to avoid confusion amongst the two sister faiths, Islam and Christianity, and obviate the possibility of Muslims converting to Christianity with this common reference.

Image from - www.bbc.co.uk

What’s in a name? Image from – http://www.bbc.co.uk

There is no Islamic Law, at least one with a unanimous consensus, that limits the use of the word ‘Allah’ only by Muslims. Quite on the contrary, it’s a given historical observation that much of the pagans of Makkah used the word ‘Allah’. The Holy Qur’an too has no mention of Jews and Christians (categorised as Ahle-Kitab, People of the Book) being forbidden from using addressing God with this term. In the Book of Psalms, Jesus is recorded to have uttered the word ‘Elahi’ on the cross, the Aramaic pronunciation of the contested word.

My Take – Monopolizing the use of this word in Malaysia, against the reasons cited by the authorities, added more confusion to the social and religious ethos of the Southeast Asian country. This controversial ruling by the judiciary over linguistics and religious rights was widely seen a threat to integration of minority groups in the country. While people of all religions attempt to find common grounds, this divide dents the otherwise peaceful nation regarded as an otherwise exemplary Muslim state.

To watch a detailed discussion on this topic by The Stream on Al Jazeera, click here.

3 – Ready for Tawaf, but first, let’s take a…

Controversy is bound to make its way when the largest religious pilgrimage on a conservative soil meets the new age behaviour of producing visual content. In sharp contrast to a time when television sets and cameras were banned in Saudi Arabia, Hajj in 2014 was in news for reasons other than religion and record statistics. In focus were pilgrims taking pictures of themselves with a digital camera or mobile phone in the midst of the supreme religious environment one witnesses in Makkah.

Image from - www.naharnet.com

A perception of foreground and background. Image from – http://www.naharnet.com

Some clerics regarded this behaviour as disdainful and anathema to the spirit of rituals at Hajj that should be far removed from intentions of boasting.

Taking such selfies and videos defy the wish of our prophet. It is as though the only purpose of this trip is to take pictures and not worship.

-Assim Al-Hakeem, a Saudi based scholar who also has a large audience base on his social media pages

(Quoted from a BBC article)
Many pilgrims, on the other hand, argued that pictures make the pilgrimage special and memorable which can be preserved for posterity.

As this is my first pilgrimage, it is important for me to document all the events taking place around me. Wherever I go, I take pictures, especially since nowadays we have these little cameras… that offer a full view of the area.

– Ali, a pilgrim from Kuwait quoted to Saudi Gazette.

My Take – While there are norms of behaviour that should guide a person’s relationship with his or her religion, an innocent desire to capture a personal journey and pilgrimage should be welcomed with more mercy than what has been demonstrated. It is important to note that while regular selfies could focus on the foreground, #HajjSelfie largely attempts to project the environment of the subject. It is the Kabah and the teeming crowds that a Hujaaj seeks to showcase, rather than his presence at a religious site. In times when the gulf between ignorance and education can be bridged by sharing images over Social Media, the Hajj Selfie can be a powerful tool to enter into a conversation, rather than controversy.

A UAE based writer and communications specialist with the blog name ‘Alex of Arabia’ has written a more detailed analysis on this issue.

2 – A Raw Slap

Indian actress Gauhar Khan was slapped on the sets of a reality show Raw Star, where she played host. As bizarre as this incident of trespassing and assault sounds, the situation took an ugly turn when the coward perpetrator and his motive surfaced.

During the show, Akhil Malik, an Imam of no mosque and a scholar of not even the foundational Arabic alphabets, considered Gauhar Khan’s outfit as offensive to Islam.

Being a Muslim woman, she should not have worn such a short dress. Actresses are the face of society and they should not wear skirts and short clothes as they make youngsters get attracted to them sexually…if actresses stop wearing short clothes, crime will decrease and lead to a better society.

Mufti Google Shaykh Wikipedia Akhil Malik

Quotes taken from independent.co.uk

While Akhil Malik gave is 1.5 cents on Islamic morality and social security, this incident sparked a debate on the notions of modest dressing and the position of Islam in deciding a Muslim’s wardrobe. Out of nowhere, Islam was forced down a host’s throat by a dispirited nobody as the entire country watched a spectacle made of the religion.

My Take – Speaking out of common sense, a religious man that conforms to the ideals of Islam would never hear or even watch an entertainment show, leave alone attending one. When the boiling blood of youth and the despair of an idle mind see no outlet, it takes extreme measures to put across a poorly thought-out point. In all honesty, I have strong doubts about the sincerity of the man who charged at the host. When 10 seconds of fame is compared with misguided religious fervor, the former seems increasingly tempting. The scholars of Islam in India have a daunting task ahead of them. Islamic education, ethics, morals, behaviour and intellectual discourse cannot remain a subject taken at madrassas – at times themselves fraught with inefficiencies and education disconnected from mainstream society.

Ways will have to be carved to educate the Muslim youth of India, who finds himself lost in the abyss of Islamic teachings which usually begin and end at locally funded seminaries. There’s a constant demand to act in accordance with acceptable moderation, and an a professional and academic approach to Islamic education can temper a mind just when it’s needed the most.

Before more young Indian Muslims find themselves humiliating fellow-beings on reality TV shows, a greater reality will have to be addressed – that of their role in the eclectic social fabric of India.

1 – A Jihadi named Romeo

Looks like in every countdown, love emerges winner. This winner has infused in it a healthy dose of hatred.

This story received much traction in the second leg of 2014, owing to its place of origin which boasts the second largest Muslim population in the world – India.

In August 2014, a young girl from Meerut filed a police case for abduction, gang-rape and forced conversion by a group of Muslims. The revised version of the victim in October, however, changed the course of the story when the victim backtracked on her statement. According to her latest confession, she had in fact eloped on her own freewill with the accused.

The period between August and October witnessed a massive counter-reaction to the emergence of this case, mostly from the BJP and it’s heavily right-winged ilk. This incident, referencing to past stray cases involving love and conversion in South India, was termed as Love Jihad – a clever coinage covering two dangerous elements people easily fall to these days.

Some publishing houses did not shy away from expressing  the politics behind this love story.

Some publishing houses did not shy away from expressing the politics behind this love story.

The debate deconstructed the religion, right from its status in India, the political ramifications of the ill-fate incident, the institutions of Islamic studies (madrassas), scholars of religion (ulemas) and many other facets that were awkwardly stuffed into the realm of love and romance. Love Jihad was one of the top trending topics in India at the time. There were hacks for the average Hindu girl to avoid being lured by Muslim men, a move that suffered backlash as most of them refused to accept any of it. Their bodies, they quipped, was not another Babri Masjid open to be swayed by religious sentiments.

My Take – It’s common for Islam in India to be completely divorced from it’s intended role, as an entity that carries with it profound scriptures, deep theology, meaningful rituals and community practices. By centering the Islamic narrative solely around vote-bank politics, the flash-points of weak Muslim performance in India have been often ignored. Weak economic performance, dismal literacy rates, self-segregation and low-levels of quality employment are some of the issues that would benefit from attention and resources. If intermixing of religious communities gives rise to problematic trends, in this case to the likes of #LoveJihad, it should be dealt with methodically, with a fair opportunity given to the common Muslims to voice their opinions.

Love, if anything, should script stories, not awkward controversies.

Latest report of the case can be read on India Today.

Here’s hoping that the only difference 2015 brings is not a coward escape from controversial and awkward situations, but a much thoughtful and respectful response from the Muslim community around the world.